Celebrating the monumental earthworks of Alabama’s first peoples.

Mound Sites

Florence Indian Mound

The large earthen mound known as the Florence Indian Mound was the heart of a large prehistoric cultural center that dominated this section of the Tennessee River Valley thousands of years ago.  An ea…

Gulf State Park Sand and Shell Mounds

Gulf State Park holds some of the most endangered archaeological deposits in the State of Alabama.  Even though these sites are located within the protected area of the park, rising sea levels and dam…

Indian Shell Mound Park

The Dauphin Island Shell Mound is actually two major features – a large shell ridge to the north and a partial shell ring to the south. A small stream fed by a nearby freshwater spring originally flow…

Moundville Archaeological Park

Spanning more than 300 acres, Moundville Archaeological Park preserves the largest indigenous mound complex in the Southeast and the remains of a civilization that dominated most of present-day Alabam…

Oakville Indian Mounds

The mound complex known as the Oakville Indian Mounds was the heart of a large cultural center that dominated this section of the Moulton Valley along Flint Creek and its tributaries from AD 1 to 500…

The Bessemer Site

The cluster of mounds known as the Bessemer Site was the largest indigenous mound site in what is now Jefferson County, and it once dominated a large territory in what became north-central Alabama.  O…

The Bottle Creek Site

The Bottle Creek site is the second largest mound site in Alabama and it represents the remnants of a large Mississippian Stage civic ceremonial complex that dominated the Mobile-Tensaw Delta from AD…

The Choccolocco Creek Archaeological Complex

Centered around Boiling Spring, the Choccolocco Creek Archaeological Complex once consisted of at least three earthen  mounds, a large stone mound and a large snake effigy (representation), also made…

The Coker Ford Site

During the Late Woodland period around AD 700-1100, people living at the confluence of the Chatuga, Coosa, and Little Rivers established one of the largest and most elaborate communities in the region…

The Fuller Site

Since at least 3,000 BC, the Mobile Tensaw Delta and Mobile Bay teemed with indigenous people moving up and down the waterways and taking overland trails to places far inland where they traded items a…

The Hamilton Mounds Site

The cluster of three mounds known as the Hamilton Mounds site is the largest indigenous mound site in Marion County, Alabama.  The site includes three mounds along the left bank of the Buttahatchee Ri…

The Mound at Fort Toulouse – Fort Jackson Park

This earthen mound and the adjacent village were built by people of the Mississippian culture who likely had some relationship to the people associated with the large site of Moundville located about…

The Mound at Old Cahawba Archaeological Park

Between AD 1500 and 1600, the indigenous inhabitants of the area around the confluence of the Cahaba and Alabama Rivers built a flat-topped mound measuring about ½ acre in size. The mound was the cent…

My location
Get Directions
Please help us preserve and protect Alabama’s cultural heritage. Report illicit artifact collection, looting and vandalism to the appropriate authorities.

About the Mound Trail

The Alabama Indigenous Mound Trail is a project of The University of Alabama and is funded in part by the Alabama Bicentennial Commission and the Alabama Association of RC&D Councils. The project links many of the publicly accessible mound sites across Alabama to bring attention to the rich cultural heritage of Alabama’s first peoples.

Learn More